Category: Reports & Stats


If you’ve been looking at college costs lately, you know it isn’t pretty out there. But it’s encouraging to see just how well NSA stacks up against both its private Christian peers and our regional state-funded universities and colleges.

The bottom line is this: the net price for attending New Saint Andrews College for one year is almost $8,000 less than the average comparable Christian college and only about $2,000 more, on average, than our closest regional state universities and colleges.

But the biggest (and often hidden) difference shows up on the matter of student debt. New Saint Andrews College offers no federal or commercial bank loans, so our students (freshmen to seniors) simply accumulate no debt burden. By contrast, students at comparable Christian colleges end up with an average of almost $16,000 of debt in their freshman year alone! Students at our closest regional public universities aren’t much better off: the average public university full-time freshman can expect to be almost $14,000 in debt at the end of his or her first year. No wonder total student debt now exceeds the nation’s total credit card debt.

So not only does New Saint Andrews have one of the lowest tuition rates and average net prices (after financial aid) among most public and private colleges and universities in the United States, its tuition is less than what the average full-time freshman will accumulate in loan debt at those other institutions. NSA is simply a great value.

The numbers pretty much speak for themselves (and, yes, please do read the fine print!):

Why NSA is the Best Value Averages Chart

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This terrific graphic by Ben Schmidt is a terrific visualization of how college majors pursue various careers and professions. The data behind the graphic is from the American Community survey. The left side identifies the college majors (in large groupings) and the right side shows the common professions actually pursued by these graduates.

The width of each stream shows how many people with a particular major are working in that field. Hold your cursor over the graph to follow specific subfields and career trajectories.

Schmidt has also broken down the data more narrowly to specific subspecializations here.  And he has another graphic showing the change of college degrees over time.

Graphic: Majors to careers visualization.

Thx to Micah Mattix and Prufrock at The American Conservative

The American Center for School Choice and the Commission on Faith-based Schools has released a disturbing report, Religious Schools in America: A Proud History and Perilous Future that notes faith-based schools are disappearing due to increased internal financial pressures and the external drains “free” (tax-funded) government alternatives, such as charter schools, are causing on school enrollments.

Funding continues to be the thorniest issue. For faith-based schools, however, the solution will not be found in direct financial support from state or federal government sources (other people’s tax dollars). That will only develop further dependency of faith-based institutions on government, which inevitably has unwanted and anti-faith strings attached.

What is needed, instead, is a new model of education funding, wherein the states do not privilege secular education with full funding from a state-based coercive tax system (which drains families of faith and others who prefer alternatives to the statist education system), but allows all families full educational choice to send their children to any schools they wish and can afford. The statist education system is threatened by that approach, but undoing the hegemony of state-based education is the only way to stop the continued decline in K-12 education in the U.S.

Allowing people the full freedom to vote with their feet and their pocketbooks (and not be forced to support the current statist system through coercive taxation) will result in a stronger, healthier and higher quality primary and secondary (and post-secondary) education system for all in the long run.

According to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics’s latest report, The Condition of Education, “the average total cost of attendance in 2011-12 for first-time, full-time students living on campus and paying in-state tuition was $21,000 at public 4-year institutions, $41,420 at private nonprofit 4-year institutions, and $30,840 at private for-profit 4-year institutions.”

Figure 1. Average total cost of attending degree-granting institutions for first-time, full-time students, by level and control of institution and living arrangement: Academic year 2011-12

 Figure 1. Average total cost of attending degree-granting institutions for first-time, full-time students, by level and control of institution and living arrangement: Academic year 2011-12

 

 

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics reports in its recently released The Condition of Education (2013) that “in 2011-12, some 25 percent of 4-year institutions had open admissions policies, 25 percent accepted three-quarters or more of their applicants, 35 percent accepted one-half to less than three-quarters of their applicants, and the remaining 15 percent accepted less than one-half of their applicants.” Here’s the breakdown graphically:

Percentage distribution of 4-year degree-granting institutions with first-year undergraduates, by application acceptance rate and control of institution: 2011-12

Percentage distribution of 4-year degree-granting institutions with first-year undergraduates, by application acceptance rate and control of institution: 2011-12