Archive for May, 2013


According to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics’s latest report, The Condition of Education, “the average total cost of attendance in 2011-12 for first-time, full-time students living on campus and paying in-state tuition was $21,000 at public 4-year institutions, $41,420 at private nonprofit 4-year institutions, and $30,840 at private for-profit 4-year institutions.”

Figure 1. Average total cost of attending degree-granting institutions for first-time, full-time students, by level and control of institution and living arrangement: Academic year 2011-12

 Figure 1. Average total cost of attending degree-granting institutions for first-time, full-time students, by level and control of institution and living arrangement: Academic year 2011-12

 

 

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According to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics latest report, The Condition of Education, the 2011 graduation rate for full-time, first-time undergraduate students who began their pursuit of a bachelor’s degree at a 4-year degree-granting institution in fall 2005 was 59 percent. That is, 59 percent of full-time, first-time students who began seeking a bachelor’s degree at a 4-year institution in fall 2005 completed the degree at that institution within 6 years. The report indicates the percentage of students that complete their program within 150 percent of the normal time for completion, that is, within 6 years for students pursuing a bachelor’s degree. Students who transfer and complete a degree at another institution are not included as completers in these rates.

Figure 1. Percentage of students seeking a bachelor’s degree at 4-year degree-granting institutions who completed a bachelor’s degree within 6 years, by control of institution and sex: Starting cohort year 2005

 Figure 1. Percentage of students seeking a bachelor's degree at 4-year degree-granting institutions who completed a bachelor's degree within 6 years, by control of institution and sex: Starting cohort year 2005

New Saint Andrews College’s graduation rate was 20 percentage points higher than the national average, or 79 percent. Among all Idaho institutions, NSA’s graduation rate was the highest. All of the state’s private 4-year colleges and universities were above 50 percent. All the state’s public colleges and universities were significantly below 50 percent, except for the University of Idaho (51 percent).

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics reports in its recently released The Condition of Education (2013) that “in 2011-12, some 25 percent of 4-year institutions had open admissions policies, 25 percent accepted three-quarters or more of their applicants, 35 percent accepted one-half to less than three-quarters of their applicants, and the remaining 15 percent accepted less than one-half of their applicants.” Here’s the breakdown graphically:

Percentage distribution of 4-year degree-granting institutions with first-year undergraduates, by application acceptance rate and control of institution: 2011-12

Percentage distribution of 4-year degree-granting institutions with first-year undergraduates, by application acceptance rate and control of institution: 2011-12

New Saint Andrews College has the highest overall graduation rate (79 percent) and retention rate (81 percent) of first-time full-time students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in the state of Idaho.  Only Idaho’s private colleges and universities have graduation rates above 60 percent.

Idaho’s 4-Year Institutions

Overall Graduation Rates, (Students who began 2005) 2011

Retention of First-Time Full-Time Students Pursuing Bachelor Degrees, 2011

Rate (%)

Rank

Rate (%)

Rank

New Saint Andrews College

79

1

81

1

College of Idaho

63

2

80

2 (tie)

Brigham Young University-Idaho

61

3

73

3

Northwest Nazarene University

52

4

72

4

University of Idaho

51

5

80

2 (tie)

Boise State University

31

6

69

5

Lewis-Clark State College

31

7

56

7

Idaho State University

29

8

61

6

Data Source: National Center for Education Statistics, College Navigator, (accessed May 20, 2013)

Academic freedom and creationists are both at risk these days on secular campuses where new academic witch hunts are underway.

A fair number of science professors at state universities,  sympathetic to a non-evolutionary theories of origins, are being vilified, brow-beaten, ostracized or even dismissed for their “unorthodox” views leaking into the classroom. Calls for their dismissal from the faculty or removal from their courses abound from secular scientists whose own religiously deep commitments to evolutionary theory and naturalistic materialism will tolerate no divergent opinions. For them, scientific orthodoxy is at stake. Their opponents are the new academic heretics.

Quite apart from the supposed conflicts of church and state–which have always been overstated by secularists and undersupported by the U.S. Constitution (all “separationist” language is found outside the constitution, not in it, for example*)–this issue has become a deep and important test of  academic freedom at secular universities.  If the new generation of evolutionary zealots win, can academic freedom–in any meaningful sense–survive? I think not. Continue reading

The Rev. Bill DeJong, pastor of Cornerstone Church, a Canadian Reformed congregation in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, delivered the 2013 commencement address at New Saint Andrews College’s 16th Commencement entitled, “The Sweetness of Light: Cultivating a Hermeneutics of Wonder.”

He previously pastored congregations in the United Reformed Church of North America for 12 years, in Grande Prairie, AB, and Kansas City, MO. He was elected the stated clerk of the URCNA federation’s Synod in 2004.

He serves on the board of directors for the Paideia Centre for Public Theology in Ancaster, Ontario.

Pastor DeJong is a Ph.D. Candidate at McMaster Divinity College, and he holds the M.Div. from Mid-America Reformed Seminary (1996) and a B.A. from Redeemer University College (1993).

His publications include a chapter in The Glory of Kings (edited by Peter Leithart and John Barach, Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick, 2011), a festschrift honoring James B. Jordan.

JGMachenpic

J. Gresham Machen (1881-1937)
Professor of NT, Princeton Seminary, 1906-1929 & founder of Westminster Theological Seminary, 1929

“We do not, I think, want a federal Department of Education because such a Department is in the interest of a principle of uniformity or standardization in education which would be the very worst calamity into which this country could fall.”

–J. Gresham Machen

Thx: Perry Coghlan & David New

State universities are bastions of liberalism, but this may be a first:  CU wants to add conservatives for intellectual diversity. Too bad libs don’t recognize conservatives as a protected class minority. Imagine them throwing a “coming out” party for a faculty member who declared herself a conservative or better, a Christian.

Read more here.