Archive for October, 2012


David Warren, president of NAICU, has done excellent work for independent colleges and universities across the U.S. over the years, but his argument in today’s NYT that federal financial aid does not contribute to increased education costs misses on two counts.

First, the effect of throwing government money (your tax dollars) at higher ed is often indirect, but still very real and very problematical. It’s inflationary effect is no urban legend, as he’d like us to believe. To claim that federal aid has no inflationary effect on college tuition at all is a self-serving claim made by those institutions dependent on that money. The test of this would be simple: if you take away their federal aid, what would happen? Institutions would either have to raise tuition to cover the gap or cut staff and programs down to what students actually need and can afford. In other words, the federal money is allowing institutions to increase expenses (programs, staffing, facilities, toys, etc.) they don’t really need and can’t actually afford. That’s ultimately unsustainable and that has artificially and unnecessarily increased the costs of higher education nationally for everyone (students and taxpayers alike). Continue reading

In case you didn’t see this week’s Time magazine (yes, that old medium) or time.com’s “cover” story, “Reinventing Higher Education,” you may want to check it out.

It contains little that’s new or news breaking, but it’s Time’s admission that our current higher education system is broken and must be reinvented. Sadly, it is a bit like reading about the collapse of the Soviet Empire and Time calling for the rebuilding of the Berlin Wall. Continue reading

Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools (MSA)

Transfer Credit, Prior Learning, and Articulation

The Commission’s requirements with respect to transfer and articulation are governed by Standards 8 (Student Admissions) and 11 (Educational Offerings) of Characteristics of Excellence in Higher Education. Assessing experiential learning for credit is addressed in Standard 13 (Related Educational Activities). Although admission standards are the responsibility and prerogative of the institution, the Commission is required to confirm for the U.S.  Department of Education certain aspects of an institution’s transfer of credit policies. Continue reading

New England Association of Schools & Colleges Commission on Institutions of Higher Education

Transfer and Award of Academic Credit

This statement is directed to institutions of postsecondary education and others concerned with the transfer of academic credit among institutions and award of academic credit for extra-institutional learning. Basic to this statement is the principle that each institution is responsible for determining its own policies and practices with regard to the transfer and award of credit.  Institutions are encouraged to review their policies and practices periodically to ensure that they accomplish the institution’s objectives and that they function in a manner that is fair and equitable to students.  Any statements, this one or others referred to, should be used as guides, not as substitutes, for institutional policies and practices. Continue reading

North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Higher Learning Commission

Policy and Good Practices on Transfer of Credit

TRANSFER OF CREDIT  (policy I.C.6)

Each institution determines its own policies and procedures for accepting transfer credits, including credits from ac- credited and non-accredited institutions, from non-U.S. institutions, and from institutions that grant credit for experiential learning and for adult learner programs. An institution’s periodic review of its transfer policies and procedures should include evaluation of their clarity to those who administer them, to the students who follow them, and to employers and other stakeholders. It should also include the consistency of their interpretation and application throughout the institution,  and their responsiveness to new types of learning opportunities outside institutions of higher education. Continue reading

Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities

Transfer and Award of Academic Credit Policy

Policy 2.5 Transfer and Award of Academic Credit

This statement is directed to institutions of higher education and others concerned with the transfer of academic credit among institutions and award of academic credit for extra-institutional learning. Basic to this statement is the principle that each institution is responsible for determining its own policies and practices with regard to the transfer and award of credit. Institutions are urged to review their policies and practices periodically to ensure that they accomplish the institution’s goals and that they function in a manner that is fair and equitable to students. Any statements, this one or others referred to, should be used as guides, not as substitutes, for institutional policies and practices. Continue reading

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges

TRANSFER OF ACADEMIC CREDIT

A Position Statement –

The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the regional accrediting body for the eleven southeastern states, recognizes that issues surrounding transfer of academic credit continue to generate debate nationally. The debate touches on questions of accountability, access, and equity in the higher education community. The Commission encourages its member institutions to review their transfer policies and procedures with a view toward making transfer of credit easier for students while continuing to honor their obligation to maintain academic quality and integrity. Institutions participating in self-regulatory, non- governmental accreditation are responsible to the public for establishing transfer processes that address both views. Continue reading

Western Association of Schools and Colleges Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities

Transfer of Credit Policy

The Commission recognizes that each institution is responsible for determining its own policies and practices with regard to the transfer and award of credit. Institutions are encouraged to review their policies and practices periodically to ensure that they accomplish the institution’s objectives and that they function in a manner that is fair and equitable to students. As part of its review for candidacy, initial accreditation, or reaffirmation of accreditation, WASC will confirm that the institution has publicly disclosed its transfer of credit policies, including a statement of the criteria it has established regarding the acceptance of credit earned at another institution of higher education. The following principles and criteria should be considered by an institution as it formulates its policies on acceptance of transfer credit. Continue reading

This “interesting” article confuses functionalism with education, the arts necessary for freedom with the arts useful to the slave, and so misunderstands the history and purpose of the liberal arts. Its call for more “practical” arts explains in part why today’s secular university is increasingly irrelevant and shallow and confused and a major contributor to our cultural malaise. http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2012/10/16/essay-calling-new-skills-be-added-liberal-arts-disciplines

The chair of Liberty University’s English department explores the changing of the political climate that has followed the changing of the guard at “Jerry’s school.”  This article in Christianity Today is simultaneously encouraging and disappointing. Encouraging, in that the new views are more nuanced and Kuyperian at root; disappointing, in that the institution’s philosophical and theological foundations cannot keep them from drifting over into social activism-lite, which too often becomes another form of squishy Christian-lite.

See: Liberty University’s Flip-Flop Moment.